Hispania

Hispania
Juan Vaquero, Acueducto de Segovia
With the arrival of the Romans around the 2nd century A.D. the Iberian Peninsula was seen for the first time as a unique territory. The Roman Empire’s new province was dubbed Hispania and, thanks to ongoing investment in public works, including roads, aqueducts, cities, bridges, ports, it soon became one of the empire’s most important provinces.

Today, the grandeur of this era can still be experienced through visits to now abandoned ancient Roman cities such as Clunia in Burgos, and Termantia and Numantia in the province of Soria. But above all, the essence of the Roman Empire can be imbibed in Spanish cities where the remains of Hispania are naturally integrated into the urban landscapes. Examples of this include Segovia, with its magnificent, still-intact aqueduct; and Merida, whose Roman theater continues to host one of Europe’s most important classical theater festivals.